Mechanics Wikipedia

Hamiltonian mechanics - Wikipedia.

Hamiltonian mechanics emerged in 1833 as a reformulation of Lagrangian mechanics.Introduced by Sir William Rowan Hamilton, Hamiltonian mechanics replaces (generalized) velocities ? used in Lagrangian mechanics with (generalized) momenta.Both theories provide interpretations of classical mechanics and describe the same physical ....

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hamiltonian_mechanics.

Fracture mechanics - Wikipedia.

Fracture mechanics is the field of mechanics concerned with the study of the propagation of cracks in materials. It uses methods of analytical solid mechanics to calculate the driving force on a crack and those of experimental solid mechanics to characterize the material's resistance to fracture.. Theoretically, the stress ahead of a sharp crack tip becomes infinite and cannot be ....

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fracture_mechanics.

Classical mechanics - Wikipedia.

Classical mechanics is a physical theory describing the motion of macroscopic objects, from projectiles to parts of machinery, and astronomical objects, such as spacecraft, planets, stars, and galaxies.For objects governed by classical mechanics, if the present state is known, it is possible to predict how it will move in the future (determinism), and how it has moved in the ....

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Classical_mechanics.

Couple (mechanics) - Wikipedia.

In mechanics, a couple is a system of forces with a resultant (a.k.a. net or sum) moment but no resultant force.. A better term is force couple or pure moment.Its effect is to create rotation without translation.In rigid body mechanics, force couples are free vectors, meaning their effects on a body are independent of the point of application.. The resultant moment of a couple is called a ....

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Couple_(mechanics).

Center of pressure (fluid mechanics) - Wikipedia.

The center of pressure is the point where the total sum of a pressure field acts on a body, causing a force to act through that point. The total force vector acting at the center of pressure is the value of the integrated vectorial pressure field. The resultant force and center of pressure location produce equivalent force and moment on the body as the original pressure field..

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Center_of_pressure_(fluid_mechanics).

Mike + The Mechanics (1985 album) - Wikipedia.

Mike + The Mechanics is the debut album by the Genesis bassist and guitarist Mike Rutherford's band Mike + The Mechanics in 1985. The album reached number 26 on the Billboard 200 album charts and had three hit singles. "Silent Running", featuring lead vocals by Paul Carrack, and the uptempo "All I Need Is a Miracle", featuring lead vocals by Paul Young, both reached the top ....

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mike_%2B_The_Mechanics_(1985_album).

Overdrive (mechanics) - Wikipedia.

Overdrive is the operation of an automobile cruising at sustained speed with reduced engine revolutions per minute (RPM), leading to better fuel consumption, lower noise, and lower wear. The term is ambiguous. The most fundamental meaning is that of an overall gear ratio between engine and wheels, such that the car is over-geared, and cannot reach its potential top speed, ....

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Overdrive_(mechanics).

Elasticity (physics) - Wikipedia.

In physics and materials science, elasticity is the ability of a body to resist a distorting influence and to return to its original size and shape when that influence or force is removed. Solid objects will deform when adequate loads are applied to them; if the material is elastic, the object will return to its initial shape and size after removal. This is in contrast to plasticity, in which ....

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Elasticity_(physics).

Aircraft flight mechanics - Wikipedia.

Aircraft flight mechanics are relevant to fixed wing (gliders, aeroplanes) and rotary wing (helicopters) aircraft.An aeroplane (airplane in US usage), is defined in ICAO Document 9110 as, "a power-driven heavier than air aircraft, deriving its lift chiefly from aerodynamic reactions on surface which remain fixed under given conditions of flight".Note that this definition excludes ....

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Aircraft_flight_mechanics.

Position (geometry) - Wikipedia.

In geometry, a position or position vector, also known as location vector or radius vector, is a Euclidean vector that represents the position of a point P in space in relation to an arbitrary reference origin O.Usually denoted x, r, or s, it corresponds to the straight line segment from O to P.In other words, it is the displacement or translation that maps the origin to P:.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Position_(geometry).

Expectation value (quantum mechanics) - Wikipedia.

In quantum mechanics, the expectation value is the probabilistic expected value of the result (measurement) of an experiment. It can be thought of as an average of all the possible outcomes of a measurement as weighted by their likelihood, and as such it is not the most probable value of a measurement; indeed the expectation value may have zero probability of occurring (e.g. ....

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Expectation_value_(quantum_mechanics).

Stress - Wikipedia.

Stress (mechanics), the internal forces that neighboring particles of a continuous material exert on each other; Occupational stress, stress related to one's job; Psychological stress, a feeling of strain and pressure; Surgical stress, systemic response to surgical injury; Arts, entertainment, and media Music Groups and musicians.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Stress.

Fluid - Wikipedia.

In physics, a fluid is a liquid, gas, or other material that continuously deforms (flows) under an applied shear stress, or external force. They have zero shear modulus, or, in simpler terms, are substances which cannot resist any shear force applied to them.. Although the term fluid generally includes both the liquid and gas phases, its definition varies among branches of ....

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fluid.

List - Wikipedia.

People. List (surname) Organizations. List College, an undergraduate division of the Jewish Theological Seminary of America; SC Germania List, German rugby union club; Other uses. Angle of list, the leaning to either port or starboard of a ship; List (abstract data type) List on Sylt, previously called List, the northernmost village in Germany, on the island of Sylt.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List.

Moment (mathematics) - Wikipedia.

In mathematics, the moments of a function are quantitative measures related to the shape of the function's graph.If the function represents mass density, then the zeroth moment is the total mass, the first moment (normalized by total mass) is the centre of mass, and the second moment is the moment of inertia.If the function is a probability distribution, then the first moment is the ....

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Moment_(mathematics).

D'Alembert's principle - Wikipedia.

D'Alembert's principle, also known as the Lagrange-d'Alembert principle, is a statement of the fundamental classical laws of motion. It is named after its discoverer, the French physicist and mathematician Jean le Rond d'Alembert.It is an extension of the principle of virtual work from static to dynamical systems.D'Alembert separates the total forces acting on a system to forces ....

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/D%27Alembert%27s_principle.

Observer effect (physics) - Wikipedia.

In physics, the observer effect is the disturbance of an observed system by the act of observation. This is often the result of instruments that, by necessity, alter the state of what they measure in some manner. A common example is checking the pressure in an automobile tire; this is difficult to do without letting out some of the air, thus changing the pressure. Similarly, seeing non ....

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Observer_effect_(physics).

Stress intensity factor - Wikipedia.

In fracture mechanics, the stress intensity factor (K) is used to predict the stress state ("stress intensity") near the tip of a crack or notch caused by a remote load or residual stresses. It is a theoretical construct usually applied to a homogeneous, linear elastic material and is useful for providing a failure criterion for brittle materials, and is a critical technique in the discipline ....

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Stress_intensity_factor.